Consumer’s Corner Driving home from work the other day, I realized that for the first time in my memory, stuttering had not been a “big deal” during the day. As a secretary in a one-person office, I talk a lot during the day. I had always struggled with my speech. Getting ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   March 01, 1998
Consumer’s Corner
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Weiss
    University of Buffalo
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Consumer's Corner
Viewpoint   |   March 01, 1998
Consumer’s Corner
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, March 1998, Vol. 8, 4. doi:10.1044/ffd8.2.4
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, March 1998, Vol. 8, 4. doi:10.1044/ffd8.2.4
Driving home from work the other day, I realized that for the first time in my memory, stuttering had not been a “big deal” during the day. As a secretary in a one-person office, I talk a lot during the day. I had always struggled with my speech. Getting to the place where I can put stuttering in its place in my daily life is important.
I did not always feel like this. In fact, when I started speech therapy a few years ago, I was looking for fluency. I really wanted perfect speech. More than anything else in the world, I wanted to never stutter again.
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