From the Editor I attended my first National Stuttering Project Convention in late June. I suppose you could say I was coerced into going, since Annie Bradberry, the executive director of the NSP, asked me to be a keynote speaker at the convention. Annie had told me that once I attended, I’d ... Editorial
Editorial  |   August 01, 1998
From the Editor
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Fluency Disorders / Editorial
Editorial   |   August 01, 1998
From the Editor
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 1998, Vol. 8, 4. doi:10.1044/ffd8.3.4
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 1998, Vol. 8, 4. doi:10.1044/ffd8.3.4
I attended my first National Stuttering Project Convention in late June. I suppose you could say I was coerced into going, since Annie Bradberry, the executive director of the NSP, asked me to be a keynote speaker at the convention. Annie had told me that once I attended, I’d be hooked. She was right. NSP was unlike anything else I’ve attended. The format is comparable to other conventions, in that there are general sessions, individual workshops, time for meeting with old friends, and making new ones, etc. However, the general atmosphere is so positive, so supportive, so friendly, so optimistic throughout the convention. As most of you know, NSP’s motto is “If you stutter, you’re not alone,” and this was quite obvious at the NSP convention. I felt a certain amount of trepidation initially, since I am both a stutterer and a speech-language pathologist. I’d heard some second-hand stories that at least some NSP members weren’t particularly fond of speech-language pathologists. However, I didn’t find that to be the case. In fact, many of the attendees were speech-language pathologists who do not stutter, and they were welcomed warmly. Many of those clinicians gave workshops at the convention. Those workshops were well attended and well received. I spoke with Lee Reeves, chairman of the Board of Directors of NSP, and he told me that in recent years the number of speech-language pathologists attending the convention has increased. He and I agreed that this was a good thing. I think we as professionals can learn a lot from the clients we are working to help. NSP provides an excellent opportunity.
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