Educating Other Professionals About What Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Do Many continuing education offerings focus on the multi-disciplinary approach to evaluation and treatment of various communication disorders. Such a focus can offer opportunities for audiologists and speech-language pathologists to educate other professions about what our professions do. The real question, however, in this competitive education and health care environment ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 1999
Educating Other Professionals About What Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Do
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Fluency Disorders / Article
Article   |   September 01, 1999
Educating Other Professionals About What Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Do
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 1999, Vol. 9, 12. doi:10.1044/ffd9.3.12
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 1999, Vol. 9, 12. doi:10.1044/ffd9.3.12
Many continuing education offerings focus on the multi-disciplinary approach to evaluation and treatment of various communication disorders. Such a focus can offer opportunities for audiologists and speech-language pathologists to educate other professions about what our professions do. The real question, however, in this competitive education and health care environment is “Should we educate others about what we do or to do what we do?” This distinction is a critical one for each speaker/educator to consider. It is a critical question for all clinicians who work in a multidisciplinary or “team” environment as well.
Educating other professionals about what audiologists and speech-language pathologists do can expand our service delivery and allow us to reach children and adults with communication disorders who might not otherwise be referred to us or who might be referred too late or later than the optimum. However, teaching other professionals to do what we do can be dangerous. All of the particular aspects of what we do that make our treatments and evaluations successful cannot be taught in any short-term continuing education environment to individuals who do not have the intensive graduate education required for audiologists and speech-language pathologists. How we successfully select and apply the assessment and treatment procedures we use depends upon our background knowledge of normal and abnormal function in each of the areas in which we work. Other professionals do not come to our continuing education programs with that kind of educational background. In addition, to teach another professional to do what we do opens up the possibility of an unnecessary and potentially unhealthy competition that could compromise outcomes for patients or even their well-being.
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