Clinical Nuggets Many years ago, I attended a Toastmasters Club meeting in Lansing Michigan, home of Oldsmobile Cars. One of the awards given out that evening was a tie pin with a miniature sparkplug attached. This was given to the person who “sparked and motivated” the meeting. Later in ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 1999
Clinical Nuggets
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Fluency Disorders / Clinical Nuggets
Article   |   September 01, 1999
Clinical Nuggets
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 1999, Vol. 9, 8-9. doi:10.1044/ffd9.3.8
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 1999, Vol. 9, 8-9. doi:10.1044/ffd9.3.8
Many years ago, I attended a Toastmasters Club meeting in Lansing Michigan, home of Oldsmobile Cars. One of the awards given out that evening was a tie pin with a miniature sparkplug attached. This was given to the person who “sparked and motivated” the meeting. Later in my career when I began to run an adult self-help group called AIMS: The American Institute for the Management of Stuttering (our logo was a broken arrow and our motto was: “AIMS Knows Stuttering”) I was wracking my brain to find ways to additionally motivate the group. I remembered the sparkplug and thought this might work. I bought a full sized sparkplug and a 1 ½ × 4 inch block of wood and drilled a hole to hold the sparkplug. On the face of this “trophy” I burned into the wood with a hot soldering iron “spark plug award.” I thought this would be great for the person who really got the group going, but what about the person who was striving for stuttering modification. It was not necessary for that person to be fluent, but rather to be showing exemplary effort toward his/her goal. Having watched The Wizard of Oz with our kids for 100 times, I was hit by the idea of the oil can and the Tin Man oiling up the hinges of his jaw and his squeaking out his first rusty words. There was my idea: get an old small metal oil can and embed the spout into another block of wood and burn into the side of the wood “The Tin Man Award.” The members of the group at the end of the meeting would vote for the two persons who would “win” the awards and to be able to take them home with them until the next meeting. You can imagine the dynamics that took place during the meeting and at the recipients home afterwards. We had great fun and intrigue with these two trophies.
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