The Creative Process in Avoidance Reduction Therapy for Stuttering The treatment of stuttering is a unique journey taken by the client and clinician. Their personal qualities and belief systems determine the paths they follow, the conversations they pursue, and the adventures they invite. The journey involves learning, and results in change. The learning process begins with intense observation ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2001
The Creative Process in Avoidance Reduction Therapy for Stuttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vivian M. Sheehan
    Private Practice, Santa Monica, CA
  • Vivian Sisskin
    University of Maryland, College Park
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2001
The Creative Process in Avoidance Reduction Therapy for Stuttering
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, January 2001, Vol. 11, 7-11. doi:10.1044/ffd11.1.7
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, January 2001, Vol. 11, 7-11. doi:10.1044/ffd11.1.7
The treatment of stuttering is a unique journey taken by the client and clinician. Their personal qualities and belief systems determine the paths they follow, the conversations they pursue, and the adventures they invite. The journey involves learning, and results in change. The learning process begins with intense observation and evolves into a set of hypotheses concerning the relative contributions of physiological, behavioral, and emotional components to the problem of stuttering for that individual. A combination of counseling and speech-language therapy culminate in increased fluency through changes in behavior, attitudes, and self-perceptions on the part of the person who stutters. These changes are the result of the choices the client makes both in and out of the therapy setting. The choice to speak in the face of fear and to tolerate the moment of shame requires enormous courage, drive, and trust in the clinician, because it runs contrary to the choices he or she has made throughout life. Where does this come from? The answer derives from the creative process in therapy, which comes to life as choice of speech targets, rationale for assignments, and interpretation of behavior and attitudes. It is experienced by the client through the client-clinician relationship.
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