How Do Students Learn if Clients Aren’t There? When I was first asked to speak at the 2001 Special Interest Division 4 (Fluency and Fluency Disorders) Leadership Conference, the suggested topic was “Getting clients in the clinic.” I questioned whether I was the best person to speak on that topic. We have been making efforts to increase ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2001
How Do Students Learn if Clients Aren’t There?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert W. Quesal
    Western Illinois University Macomb, IL
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2001
How Do Students Learn if Clients Aren’t There?
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 8-11. doi:10.1044/ffd11.4.8
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 8-11. doi:10.1044/ffd11.4.8
When I was first asked to speak at the 2001 Special Interest Division 4 (Fluency and Fluency Disorders) Leadership Conference, the suggested topic was “Getting clients in the clinic.” I questioned whether I was the best person to speak on that topic. We have been making efforts to increase the numbers of fluency clients in our clinic at Western Illinois University, but have not had a lot of success, in spite of putting up posters on campus and getting some media coverage in the area. We have historically had a low number of stutterers on the caseload at WIU. In spite of that, I feel that graduates of WIU’s Communication Sciences and Disorders master’s program leave with a good knowledge of stuttering and good basic clinical knowledge and skills. I like to attribute that, at least in part, to the way that I teach stuttering and fluency disorders. In this paper, I would like to discuss things we can do to help our students be better prepared to work with clients who stutter, even if they get little or no practicum experience while on-campus.
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