Telling the Backstory: Jim Dyer, the San Jose Mercury News, and “Ethics and Orphans” Last November, I published an article in Lingua Franca about speech-language pathologists’ reactions to an investigation by Jim Dyer, a reporter at the San Jose Mercury News, into the aftermath of Wendell Johnson’s 1939 so-called “Monster Study.” To make the piece shorter, my editors cut some information about Dyer, ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2002
Telling the Backstory: Jim Dyer, the San Jose Mercury News, and “Ethics and Orphans”
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Erard
    Austin, TX
    Writer
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2002
Telling the Backstory: Jim Dyer, the San Jose Mercury News, and “Ethics and Orphans”
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 11-13. doi:10.1044/ffd12.1.11
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 11-13. doi:10.1044/ffd12.1.11
Last November, I published an article in Lingua Franca about speech-language pathologists’ reactions to an investigation by Jim Dyer, a reporter at the San Jose Mercury News, into the aftermath of Wendell Johnson’s 1939 so-called “Monster Study.” To make the piece shorter, my editors cut some information about Dyer, which I include here to clarify for fluency specialists his role in the controversy. By responding to the scientific community, I hope to make the point that interdisciplinary contacts benefit when scientists take journalists as seriously as they want journalists to take them.
If I understand the values of journalists and academics, it’s because I’m a member of both groups. After receiving my PhD in English in 2000 from the University of Texas at Austin, I returned to writing. Since going freelance full time 6 months ago, I have written about diverse linguistic topics for The Atlantic Monthly, Lingua Franca, and the Texas Observer. It’s a beat that extends my academic training in linguistics and my dissertation topic, the rhetoric of American linguistics in the twentieth century.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.