More Than Meets the Eye Contact Eye aversion, or intentional breaking of eye contact during moments of stuttering, is more than meets the eye. It is far more than just a behavior. To fully understand eye aversion it is important to examine it from several angles. These include: (a) defining appropriate eye contact, (b) the ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2002
More Than Meets the Eye Contact
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tim Mackesey
    Private Practice, Atlanta Area Stuttering Specialists Atlanta, GA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2002
More Than Meets the Eye Contact
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 13-15. doi:10.1044/ffd12.1.13
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 13-15. doi:10.1044/ffd12.1.13
Eye aversion, or intentional breaking of eye contact during moments of stuttering, is more than meets the eye. It is far more than just a behavior. To fully understand eye aversion it is important to examine it from several angles. These include: (a) defining appropriate eye contact, (b) the positive intention behind eye aversion, (c) the cognitive and emotional aspects of eye aversion, (d) the listener’s perception of eye aversion.
First we must attempt to define appropriate eye contact. Appropriate eye contact does not mean staring like a deer in headlights into your listener’s eyes. In fact, that is impossible because humans follow a distinct pattern of eye accessing cues as they retrieve and/ or formulate information. For example, a right-handed person will look up and left when accessing pictures, look up and to the right when creating pictures, look down when accessing emotions, and look left and right respectively when accessing or creating dialogue (Brooks, 1989). So, there is natural and necessary eye movement when conversing. If you stutter, or provide services to those who do, you know how to recognize eye aversion.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.