Clinical Nuggets: Fluency Toolbox When targeting fluency shaping objectives, the term “fluency tools” is often used in speech therapy to describe the various fluency shaping strategies (Walton & Wallace, 1998; Guitar, 1998). Common fluency tools include slow speech, easy onset, stretching out the initial phoneme sequences in a word, and phrasing. When working ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2002
Clinical Nuggets: Fluency Toolbox
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marybeth Allen
    University of Maine, Orono
  • Mary Emerson
    University of Maine, Orono
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Nuggets
Article   |   April 01, 2002
Clinical Nuggets: Fluency Toolbox
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 15-16. doi:10.1044/ffd12.1.15
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 15-16. doi:10.1044/ffd12.1.15
When targeting fluency shaping objectives, the term “fluency tools” is often used in speech therapy to describe the various fluency shaping strategies (Walton & Wallace, 1998; Guitar, 1998). Common fluency tools include slow speech, easy onset, stretching out the initial phoneme sequences in a word, and phrasing. When working with an older school-aged student or an adult, these concepts can be conceptualized and practiced by the client using verbal definitions along with modeling and imitating the clinician. When working with a preschooler, however, these strategies, often grouped together in the term “easy speech,” can be abstract concepts for the 3 to 5-year-old mind. In fact, just talking about speech and ways that the child can change or produce speech is abstract. Clinicians will, therefore, use concrete symbols that relate to the various strategies and/or types of talking. For example, in the Fluency Development System (Fosnot & Woodford, 1992), a turtle, horse, and snail are used to symbolize slow speech, fast stumbling speech, and sticky speech respectively. Fun with Fluency (Walton & Wallace, 1998) uses tigger talk to conceptualize “bumpy talking.” A preschooler we worked with a few years ago chose an elephant to help describe and symbolize the “pushing” he did when trying to force a word out.
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