Coordinator’s Corner The most recent Leadership Conference in Albuquerque was judged to be a tremendous success by its sold-out attendance. Evaluation ratings described the meeting as “outstanding,” while individuals wrote comments such as the following: Because of the apparent success of the meeting in providing valuable information and interaction to Its ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   August 01, 2002
Coordinator’s Corner
Author Notes
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   August 01, 2002
Coordinator’s Corner
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2002, Vol. 12, 1-3. doi:10.1044/ffd12.2.1
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2002, Vol. 12, 1-3. doi:10.1044/ffd12.2.1
The most recent Leadership Conference in Albuquerque was judged to be a tremendous success by its sold-out attendance. Evaluation ratings described the meeting as “outstanding,” while individuals wrote comments such as the following:
Because of the apparent success of the meeting in providing valuable information and interaction to Its attendees, the Steering Committee was shocked to receive letters from a single attendee chastising the group and the two conference coordinators in particular.
The nature of the complaint? That the conference coordinators provided and continue to provide a poor role model for clinicians and people who stutter, because their speech still contains disflaencies that clearly mark them as persons who stutter. In fact, the note’s author protested that, since “all people who stutter can all learn to speak normally fluently,” “SLPs who stutter should work on their own speech and seek appropriate treatment and attempt to speak as fluently as they are capable of, lest they model for their clients and their colleagues speech which is less than normal..giving the wrong impression...that normal fluency is not attainable...There is no reason (emphasis mine)...why all who stutter...cannot achieve and maintain normally fluent speech. Continuing to stutter in this modern day and age is very inappropriate, especially for SLPs, much like continuing to smoke...”
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