Functional Neuroimaging of Speech Production in People Who Stutter The overarching aim of the fluency research being conducted at the University of Utah is to combine behavioral and functional brain-imaging studies. Our goal is to examine the neural bases for speech planning, production, and feedback in stuttering and fluent speakers. In addition to our current stuttering-nonstuttering group comparisons, ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2002
Functional Neuroimaging of Speech Production in People Who Stutter
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Blomgren
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Srikantan Nagarajan
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2002
Functional Neuroimaging of Speech Production in People Who Stutter
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2002, Vol. 12, 3-6. doi:10.1044/ffd12.2.3
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2002, Vol. 12, 3-6. doi:10.1044/ffd12.2.3
The overarching aim of the fluency research being conducted at the University of Utah is to combine behavioral and functional brain-imaging studies. Our goal is to examine the neural bases for speech planning, production, and feedback in stuttering and fluent speakers. In addition to our current stuttering-nonstuttering group comparisons, we are planning to examine behavioral and neurobiological changes, enabled by brain plasticity, that occur as a result of intensive stuttering therapy. Functional brain imaging is based on the rationale that performance of any task places specific information processing demands on the brain. These specific demands can be measured using either hemodynamic methods or neuromagnetic source methods. Hemodynamic methods measure changes in local blood flow that can be quantified using either positron emission tomography (PET) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Neuromagnetic data are collected using magnetoencephalography (MEG), which measures the magnetic flux occurring within the brain during different tasks. When MEG is co-registered with a static MRI image, it is termed magnetic source imaging (MSI). We are presently capitalizing on both the excellent spatial resolution of fMRI and the superior temporal resolution of MSI to investigate the presence and extent of differences between stuttering and nonstuttering speakers. The goal of this article is to review the imaging technologies currently being utilized at the University of Utah and to discuss some of our preliminary findings related to speech production.
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