Diagnostic Codes and the Nature of Stuttering: Researchers’ Reflections For many years, professionals and people who stutter have expressed great dissatisfaction with the diagnostic codes used to classify stuttering. The current National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes include stammering and stuttering with “Neurotic Disorders, Personality Disorders, and Other Nonpsychotic Mental Disorders.” Although there is ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2002
Diagnostic Codes and the Nature of Stuttering: Researchers’ Reflections
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer B. Watson
    Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Practice Management / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2002
Diagnostic Codes and the Nature of Stuttering: Researchers’ Reflections
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2002, Vol. 12, 7. doi:10.1044/ffd12.2.7
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2002, Vol. 12, 7. doi:10.1044/ffd12.2.7
For many years, professionals and people who stutter have expressed great dissatisfaction with the diagnostic codes used to classify stuttering. The current National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes include stammering and stuttering with “Neurotic Disorders, Personality Disorders, and Other Nonpsychotic Mental Disorders.” Although there is agreement that this current classification of stuttering as a mental disorder is inappropriate and inaccurate, there is less, consensus as to which diagnostic code is most appropriate. The debate about the code under which, stuttering should be classified in part stems from different views on the nature and/or etiology of stuttering. Efforts to delineate the etiology of stuttering based on recent empirical reports have included discussions of stuttering in terms of anatomical and physiological differences, neurophysiological organization, and genetics. What is our current understanding of the nature and etiology of stuttering? Further, what empirical evidence do we have to support this understanding?
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