Planting a Lifetime of Success For those of us who are therapists working with school children who are disfluent, the desired outcomes of our efforts lie in the invisible future of the child's life. As we work to “build” skills that help these children enhance fluency in the present, we also need to “plant” ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2002
Planting a Lifetime of Success
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phillip Schneider
    Queens College, New York, NY
Article Information
Development / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2002
Planting a Lifetime of Success
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, December 2002, Vol. 12, 14-16. doi:10.1044/ffd12.3.14
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, December 2002, Vol. 12, 14-16. doi:10.1044/ffd12.3.14
For those of us who are therapists working with school children who are disfluent, the desired outcomes of our efforts lie in the invisible future of the child's life. As we work to “build” skills that help these children enhance fluency in the present, we also need to “plant” values, entitlements, and perspectives that support positive future adaptations to life, self, communication, and stuttering. It is this “planting” which is the focus of these thoughts.
Most school children who are disfluent, have been so for years. Many will improve, while others will retain fluency difficulties for years and some for a lifetime. Some will adapt effectively to life with speech interruptions and appear undaunted, while others will mal-adapt and develop shame. To avoid the pain associated with shame, some will self-impose social, educational, recreational, and vocational deprivations. What begins as fluency instability has the potential to develop into a life-limiting force. Our goal is to help children who stutter grow into adults who communicate effectively, have healthy self-esteem, develop loving relationships, and earn their livelihood through meaningful work. Stuttering can threaten these goals. We need to equip children with skills for enhancing fluency and coping with stuttering, as well as immunizing them against negative adaptations that can lead to pain and suffering. We can do this by supplementing skill building with the “planting” of values, entitlements, and perspectives.
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