Managing Insurance Issues in a Small Private Practice A therapist in a small speech-language pathology private practice should not automatically assume that joining all the insurance provider panels possible in the area is the most beneficial arrangement. A larger practice may be better able to afford an individual just to manage billing and insurance related issues, which ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2003
Managing Insurance Issues in a Small Private Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda M. Huntress
    Center for Language & Cognitive Rehabilitation, Cincinnati, OH
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2003
Managing Insurance Issues in a Small Private Practice
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2003, Vol. 13, 20-22. doi:10.1044/ffd13.1.20
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2003, Vol. 13, 20-22. doi:10.1044/ffd13.1.20
A therapist in a small speech-language pathology private practice should not automatically assume that joining all the insurance provider panels possible in the area is the most beneficial arrangement. A larger practice may be better able to afford an individual just to manage billing and insurance related issues, which many do. A smaller practice should carefully consider the advantages and disadvantages of insurance coverage before making a decision. Much of the following information is intended to help clarify thinking and is gleaned from discussions with members of the Cincinnati Insurance Initiative and long experience in the field.
One of the primary questions to ask yourself before the process begins is what your hourly cost of doing business is. The simplest computation of this figure would be the total number of hours you work a year divided by your total costs (including rent, phone, supplies, liability insurance, wages paid, continuing education fees, etc.). Thus, if you are making less than this figure during an hour, you are losing money. Probably few of us entered this field primarily to make money, but if we are not doing so, we will not be able to remain in practice to enjoy all the other reasons that brought us into the field.
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