Treatment Efficacy Research and Clinical Treatment The terms efficacy and efficiency can be defined very simply by: (a) pre- and post-test data on the target variable (e.g., stuttered speech), (b) clear, replicable descriptions of the treatment (e.g., a manual), and (c ) efficiency or how long does the procedure take to achieve normal speech fluency ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2003
Treatment Efficacy Research and Clinical Treatment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bruce P. Ryan
    California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2003
Treatment Efficacy Research and Clinical Treatment
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2003, Vol. 13, 31-33. doi:10.1044/ffd13.1.31
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2003, Vol. 13, 31-33. doi:10.1044/ffd13.1.31
The terms efficacy and efficiency can be defined very simply by: (a) pre- and post-test data on the target variable (e.g., stuttered speech), (b) clear, replicable descriptions of the treatment (e.g., a manual), and (c ) efficiency or how long does the procedure take to achieve normal speech fluency (e.g., hours required to reach clinical goals). Additional criteria and definitions of efficacy and/or how to conduct and evaluate clinical trials or efficacy research may be found in Brutten (1993), Ingham and Riley (1998), Ryan (2001b), and Robey and Schultz (1998), among others. A recent, excellent example of clinical efficacy research to evaluate treatment programs is Ingham and colleagues (2001) . Timely reviews of similar procedures in public schools and elsewhere will be found in Bothe (2002), Conture (1996), and Cordes (1998) . Without these minimum data, published in a reputable journal, any discussion of a treatment of stuttering is incomplete and its effectiveness and efficiency unknown, and very speculative. A recent exchange of information with the Division 4 Steering Committee (e.g., Power, 2002; Ratner, 2002; N. Ratner and J. S. Yaruss, personal communication, June and August, 2002; Ryan, in press; Yaruss & Quesal, 2002) suggests, in my opinion, that the Steering Committee itself does not understand the parameters and values of published clinical treatment efficacy research. I am afraid that, in addition, many clinicians and the university personnel responsible for training them simply do not read and/or understand and/or appreciate the clinical trial research published in our most respected journals (e.g., Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research).
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