Working Together To Create Positive Change Providing quality services to children who stutter in the schools is a multidimensional problem. Speech-language pathologists experienced in treating school-age children who stutter reported that many of them encounter challenges including creating appropriate IEPs, working with families, transfer and maintenance, treatment strategies, and training for the inexperienced and/or student ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2003
Working Together To Create Positive Change
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan M. Cochrane
    Honeye, NY
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2003
Working Together To Create Positive Change
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2003, Vol. 13, 34-35. doi:10.1044/ffd13.1.34
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2003, Vol. 13, 34-35. doi:10.1044/ffd13.1.34
Providing quality services to children who stutter in the schools is a multidimensional problem. Speech-language pathologists experienced in treating school-age children who stutter reported that many of them encounter challenges including creating appropriate IEPs, working with families, transfer and maintenance, treatment strategies, and training for the inexperienced and/or student clinician. This article will describe one attempt at making positive changes for children who stutter in the schools.
Is efficacious treatment possible for children who stutter in the schools?
Quality fluency treatment has been provided successfully within the public schools in the past. I have described a therapy program and how it was successfully implemented within an urban school district (Cochrane, 1994, 1998). At the time, I paid little attention to the reality that it was actually my administrator, endorsing the program, who made it possible. With this administrator’s uncompromising support, I was able to modify the “traditional” school district’s approach and structure to speech therapy so that individual and effective treatment plans could be designed and implemented for each of the children who stuttered. The best thought-out goals and objectives, introduced by a talented fluency specialist are worthless, if the structure within which they are presented is incapable of providing the foundation necessary for effective treatment. It is this “traditional system” that I propose we change. How can we change the “system” without the good fortune of having a dynamic supervisor such as I experienced? The following is a description of how to begin implementing “systemic change” within the public school system.
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