“Demystifying” Our Role as Counselors With Adults Who Stutter During a recent focus group for public school clinicians, the topic of clinicians’ needs was discussed. It was established that a significant number of public school clinicians feel “uncomfortable” when working with fluency clients (Tetnowski, Damico, & Tetnowski, 2003). This has been documented in the literature over the years ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2003
“Demystifying” Our Role as Counselors With Adults Who Stutter
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John A. Tetnowski
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2003
“Demystifying” Our Role as Counselors With Adults Who Stutter
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, December 2003, Vol. 13, 7-10. doi:10.1044/ffd13.2.7
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, December 2003, Vol. 13, 7-10. doi:10.1044/ffd13.2.7
During a recent focus group for public school clinicians, the topic of clinicians’ needs was discussed. It was established that a significant number of public school clinicians feel “uncomfortable” when working with fluency clients (Tetnowski, Damico, & Tetnowski, 2003). This has been documented in the literature over the years (e.g., Brisk, Healey, & Hux, 1997), but what made the focus group more interesting were the reasons why clinicians felt uncomfortable when treating clients who stutter. Several participants in the group alluded to issues like “having to treat the entire person” and “having to know more than just the speech characteristics.” Some clinicians even indicated that their clients who stutter may even have (dare I say), “emotional issues” that have to be addressed. Despite the fact that this paper addresses counseling with adult clients, the issues regarding counseling were made very apparent by this group of public school clinicians. It is possible that clinicians’ attitudes about stuttering therapy are judged to be less than adequate because of their fear of providing counseling for their clients who stutter, especially adults who can see through any false attempts at treating this complex disorder. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to help demystify the counseling issues that so many clinicians fear.
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