Accreditation Change and Opportunity: Employing Essential Principles Over the past several years, the areas of speech-language pathology and audiology have undergone some significant changes. In addition to the constant influx of new research data and the requisite conceptual changes these data suggest, these professions are also seeing some modifications in service delivery foci (e.g., literacy, dysphagia), ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2004
Accreditation Change and Opportunity: Employing Essential Principles
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jack S. Damico
    University of Louisiana-Lafayette
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2004
Accreditation Change and Opportunity: Employing Essential Principles
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, July 2004, Vol. 14, 10-13. doi:10.1044/ffd14.1.10
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, July 2004, Vol. 14, 10-13. doi:10.1044/ffd14.1.10
Over the past several years, the areas of speech-language pathology and audiology have undergone some significant changes. In addition to the constant influx of new research data and the requisite conceptual changes these data suggest, these professions are also seeing some modifications in service delivery foci (e.g., literacy, dysphagia), in traditional approaches to doctoral education (e.g., research versus clinical doctorates), and even in the long-standing relationship between speech-language pathology and audiology. One of the most significant changes has been the formulation of the new certification standards (ASHA, 2003) and the evolution of our educational and program accreditation standards to accommodate them (ASHA, 2004). Along with Quesal (2002), I believe that these standards will result in significant changes in our profession and the ways we educate our students. This has certainly been the case in the past when other less dramatic changes have been made. In some cases, the earlier changes resulted in some negative outcomes (e.g., Yaruss & Quesal, 2002). The new changes, however, need not be negative. Rather, the changing standards actually provide us with opportunities to modify our programs in positive ways. To ensure how these opportunities might be exploited, it is important to understand what is at stake with the changes and to recognize some of the ways that we should guide our implementation.
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