A Child With Atypical Stuttering: A Case Study This article will discuss a 4-year-old male who exhibited an unusual stuttering problem. Included in the discussion is the information obtained in his initial evaluation, including a description of his stuttering behaviors, a description of the intervention provided to him and his family, and the progress he’s made in ... Case Study
Case Study  |   July 01, 2004
A Child With Atypical Stuttering: A Case Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlie Osborne
    University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Case Study
Case Study   |   July 01, 2004
A Child With Atypical Stuttering: A Case Study
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, July 2004, Vol. 14, 3-6. doi:10.1044/ffd14.1.3
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, July 2004, Vol. 14, 3-6. doi:10.1044/ffd14.1.3
This article will discuss a 4-year-old male who exhibited an unusual stuttering problem. Included in the discussion is the information obtained in his initial evaluation, including a description of his stuttering behaviors, a description of the intervention provided to him and his family, and the progress he’s made in therapy to date.
JS was seen for an initial evaluation when he was 4 years, 2 months old. His mother reported that she and her husband first became concerned about his speech “a few months” prior to the evaluation. Both parents had noticed stuttering behaviors at age 2, but thought he would “grow out of it.” His mother related that his speech fluency had not changed significantly since he was 2 years old, but that she had noticed an increase in stuttering behaviors recently as his use of complex language had increased. She indicated that her concerns about JS’s speech were regarding his “slow speech: he sometimes gets stuck on a word in the middle of a syllable.” The parents reported that they had dealt with JS’s stuttering problem by giving him their “undivided attention when we see him having difficulties (stop what we’re doing, make direct eye contact).” His mother indicated that she was concerned “that others may not give JS the time to finish his sentences and this would definitely affect his selfesteem as he interacts more with others.” She stated that her son expresses himself using “full sentences, but gets stuck on a word— he may be distracted and lose his train of thought, also speaks slow.” She indicated that he usually gets stuck “in the middle of a sentence, in the middle of a word.” His mother said JS is very active and quiet around others. She also described him as a perfectionist: “very picky in language, i.e., corrects me when I call a glove a mitten.” JS attended preschool two mornings a week. His strengths were listed as “manners, use of multiple syllable words, use of adjectives and adverbs, imagination.” He reportedly was not aware of his stuttering behaviors and had not displayed concern or expressed any frustration with talking. Other information obtained from the case history included: no reported family history of stuttering or of any other speech or language problem; a normal pregnancy, but difficult delivery (he was “stuck in birth canal, dislocated clavicle at birth”); all developmental motor milestones within expected levels; no history of significant illnesses; and no other concerns regarding his overall development or communication abilities.
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