Arrows in the Quiver Watching the archery competition in the Olympics made me aware of the various attempts we, as clinicians, often make in helping clients hit the communicative targets they present. It struck me that Olympians use several arrows that land in various levels of concentric circles to determine the outcome of ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
Arrows in the Quiver
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Susca
    University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2004
Arrows in the Quiver
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, October 2004, Vol. 14, 12-13. doi:10.1044/ffd14.2.12
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, October 2004, Vol. 14, 12-13. doi:10.1044/ffd14.2.12
Watching the archery competition in the Olympics made me aware of the various attempts we, as clinicians, often make in helping clients hit the communicative targets they present. It struck me that Olympians use several arrows that land in various levels of concentric circles to determine the outcome of their performance. Arrows are designed to fit the Olympian, as many therapeutic interventions seem to fit the clinician who offers them to the client. But it is how the Olympian is coached to use the arrows, as the client uses therapeutic interventions, which ultimately determines the outcome. Although Olympians aim for similar looking targets, the process to getting a medal is not always the same. It takes many shots, using arrows in sets of three or six, to collect enough points to win a medal. As a fluency specialist, which I often think of synonymously as “communication” specialist, the multiple arrows Olympians use on different targets presents a metaphor for the multiple methods clients may use for different therapeutic goals.
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