Establishing the Validity of Stuttering Treatment Effectiveness: The Fallibility of Clinical Experience Recently, there has been much discussion about an evidence-based approach to stuttering treatment: an approach that ideally refers to an empirically driven, measurement based, and client sensitive approach to treatment (Finn, 2003). At the same time, some cautions have been raised about fully embracing this approach, because it may ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
Establishing the Validity of Stuttering Treatment Effectiveness: The Fallibility of Clinical Experience
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patrick Finn
    University of Arizon, Tucson
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2004
Establishing the Validity of Stuttering Treatment Effectiveness: The Fallibility of Clinical Experience
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, October 2004, Vol. 14, 9-12. doi:10.1044/ffd14.2.9
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, October 2004, Vol. 14, 9-12. doi:10.1044/ffd14.2.9
Recently, there has been much discussion about an evidence-based approach to stuttering treatment: an approach that ideally refers to an empirically driven, measurement based, and client sensitive approach to treatment (Finn, 2003). At the same time, some cautions have been raised about fully embracing this approach, because it may be too limiting (e.g., Bernstein Ratner, 2004). But, if we do not use an evidence-based approach, then what is the alternative? One suggestion is that we should use a more clinically-driven approach. Indeed, Division 4 has made such a suggestion as witnessed in the practice guidelines published in 1995, where it was argued that empirical evidence may be too limiting a basis for determining a treatment approach and that clinical experience or common practice could be one basis for deciding how to manage stuttering (ASHA). The main purpose of this article is to suggest that clinical experience is an insufficient basis for determining treatment effectiveness, because of problems related to cognitive factors and environmental influences that could lead to potentially erroneous beliefs and poor decisions.
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