When a Student Stutters: Identifying the Adverse Educational Impact As school-based speech-language pathologiosts (SLPs), we are asked to consider the “whole child” when determining eligibility for speech and language services. Gone are the days when we assessed a communicative disability in an isolated context. In presenting the “whole child” at an IEP meeting, the emphasis is on the ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2006
When a Student Stutters: Identifying the Adverse Educational Impact
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Ribbler
    Broward County School District, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   February 01, 2006
When a Student Stutters: Identifying the Adverse Educational Impact
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, February 2006, Vol. 16, 15-17. doi:10.1044/ffd16.1.15
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, February 2006, Vol. 16, 15-17. doi:10.1044/ffd16.1.15
As school-based speech-language pathologiosts (SLPs), we are asked to consider the “whole child” when determining eligibility for speech and language services. Gone are the days when we assessed a communicative disability in an isolated context. In presenting the “whole child” at an IEP meeting, the emphasis is on the child rather than the various educational domains or professional disciplines gathered to address the disability. In most cases, there is an overlap when addressing the various academic, social, independent functioning, and communication domains. School-based SLPs are also requested to report the “adverse educational impact” (AEI) of a disability. For students who stutter, the impact goes beyond the communication domain. In fact, stuttering can affect all areas of academic competency, including academic learning, social-emotional functioning, and independent functioning. When justifying eligibility, we must inform and educate the IEP team about the multidimensional impact stuttering can have on all aspects of the educational process. By explaining how stuttering can affect learning, social skills, and independent functioning, we can help coordinate interventions between the SLP and the general education teacher. This student-centered approach leads to a more integrated program and functional outcomes are hypothesized to improve.
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