Speech Disfluency in Asperger’s Syndrome: Two Cases of Interest Last year, I had the opportunity to participate in a Youth and Family Day Workshop sponsored by the National Stuttering Association. The room was filled with parents of children who stutter, asking questions about the latest in research, treatment, and advice for helping at home. I mentioned in passing ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2006
Speech Disfluency in Asperger’s Syndrome: Two Cases of Interest
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vivian Sisskin
    University of Maryland, College Park
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2006
Speech Disfluency in Asperger’s Syndrome: Two Cases of Interest
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2006, Vol. 16, 12-14. doi:10.1044/ffd16.2.12
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2006, Vol. 16, 12-14. doi:10.1044/ffd16.2.12
Last year, I had the opportunity to participate in a Youth and Family Day Workshop sponsored by the National Stuttering Association. The room was filled with parents of children who stutter, asking questions about the latest in research, treatment, and advice for helping at home. I mentioned in passing that my other clinical interest was communication in autism spectrum disorders. I was surprised to find that three families approached me during the lunch period with similar questions, all related to their child (attending the workshop) who also was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, some with unusual stuttering behaviors and with varying degrees of awareness and reactivity. I began thinking about several other cases I had recently seen for fluency evaluations with autism, one demonstrating classic struggle and escape behaviors, and two others with unusual disfluency types with no apparent awareness. A search of the literature revealed virtually no studies on the speech fluency of children with autism spectrum disorders and no references to concomitant disorders of stuttering and autism. Yet, the two conditions apparently can co-occur.
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