Apraxia and Stuttering/Cluttering Editor’s Note: The author of the following article has a financial interest in the Speech Motor Exercises program described in the publication Speech Motor Exercises. Although apraxia and stuttering disorders have probably always been with us, apraxia was first identified by Paul Broca 134 years ago. Then in 1970, ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2006
Apraxia and Stuttering/Cluttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David A. Daly
    Daly’s Speech & Language Center, Farmington, MI
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2006
Apraxia and Stuttering/Cluttering
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2006, Vol. 16, 7-10. doi:10.1044/ffd16.2.7
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, September 2006, Vol. 16, 7-10. doi:10.1044/ffd16.2.7
Editor’s Note: The author of the following article has a financial interest in the Speech Motor Exercises program described in the publication Speech Motor Exercises.
Although apraxia and stuttering disorders have probably always been with us, apraxia was first identified by Paul Broca 134 years ago. Then in 1970, Fred Darley identified apraxia in adults as an articulatory disorder in patients who have incurred a left cerebral hemisphere injury. Darley described several symptoms of speech apraxia:
Darley (1970) maintained that the outstanding feature of apraxia was the occurrence of articulation errors-highly variable and inconsistent errors-typically substitutions, but also additions, repetitions, and omissions. It is now recognized that for clients with apraxia, articulatory accuracy is dependent upon the complexity of the task, with affricatives, fricatives, and consonant clusters more often inaccurately produced. As with the stutterer, length of words also is important, with polysyllabic words produced less correctly. Effortful struggle often occurs in an attempt to correct postures and movement sequences. Some clients with apraxia avoid certain words. And, like the stutterer in trying to utter feared words, some clients with apraxia may change their prosody.
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