Getting the Maximum Benefits From Support Groups: Perspectives of Members and Group Leaders Some people are able to help others as they come to grips with problems that arise in living. In our culture, people who “help” often choose to use their skills as part of a profession such as speech-language pathology. However, “helping” can also come from friends and strangers (Egan, ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2007
Getting the Maximum Benefits From Support Groups: Perspectives of Members and Group Leaders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mitchell Trichon
    Lafayette, LA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   February 01, 2007
Getting the Maximum Benefits From Support Groups: Perspectives of Members and Group Leaders
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, February 2007, Vol. 17, 10-13. doi:10.1044/ffd17.1.10
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, February 2007, Vol. 17, 10-13. doi:10.1044/ffd17.1.10
Some people are able to help others as they come to grips with problems that arise in living. In our culture, people who “help” often choose to use their skills as part of a profession such as speech-language pathology. However, “helping” can also come from friends and strangers (Egan, 2002). In the realm of stuttering, there is much “helping” that takes place in the form of peer support or support groups. To give you a personal perspective, let me take you back a dozen years.
Back then I thought, “Me attend a support group? That’s for them! Why should I accept myself as a person who stutters? I can control my speech. I just need to work harder.” Having sustained fluency for periods of time via speech-language pathology treatment, I guess one can say that I was once a “fluency snob.” Despite having attended and having learned from support groups during high school and as an undergraduate in college, my view was that support groups were for people who stuttered more severely and for those who needed to come to terms with their stuttering. In my 20s, I felt that attending a support group, which helps with self-acceptance while aiming to be a more fluent speaker, was a contradiction.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.