SLPs and Self-Help Groups—Why a Close Relationship is Vital The fact that stuttering is more than just dysfluent speech is surely well recognized by most speech-language pathologists (SLPs). They would also appreciate that an understanding of what that “more” is, is crucial to providing effective therapy specific for each client. For me, one of the most interesting comments ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2007
SLPs and Self-Help Groups—Why a Close Relationship is Vital
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Irwin
    Internatonal Stuttering Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Professional Issues & Training / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / ASHA News & Member Stories / International & Global / Articles
Article   |   February 01, 2007
SLPs and Self-Help Groups—Why a Close Relationship is Vital
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, February 2007, Vol. 17, 13-15. doi:10.1044/ffd17.1.13
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, February 2007, Vol. 17, 13-15. doi:10.1044/ffd17.1.13
The fact that stuttering is more than just dysfluent speech is surely well recognized by most speech-language pathologists (SLPs). They would also appreciate that an understanding of what that “more” is, is crucial to providing effective therapy specific for each client.
For me, one of the most interesting comments on this year's International Stuttering Awareness Day (ISAD) 2006 online conference was the report of a Russian study on the association of social phobia with stuttering (See Greg Snyder's article via ISAD 2006 online conference at http://www.mnsu.edu/comdis/isad9/papers/ snyder9.html). Dr Ilia Rasskazov, a psychiatrist and director of the Scientific Research Centre, Moscow, quoted a 2005 study of 157 people who stutter (PWS). Using the Lebovich Test, which according to Dr Rasskazov is the measure used by the World Psychiatric Association for determining severity of social phobia, he reported that 91% of the PWS had some degree of social phobia with 43% having severe social phobia.
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