Teaching the Culture of Stuttering My first dilemma is figuring out a perspective from which to share my thoughts. I am a person who stutters; I’m a speech-language pathologist; I provide treatment for other people who stutter; I teach graduate students to do stuttering treatment; I am a member of a stuttering support group; ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2007
Teaching the Culture of Stuttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gary J. Rentschler
    Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   February 01, 2007
Teaching the Culture of Stuttering
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, February 2007, Vol. 17, 21-23. doi:10.1044/ffd17.1.21
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, February 2007, Vol. 17, 21-23. doi:10.1044/ffd17.1.21
My first dilemma is figuring out a perspective from which to share my thoughts. I am a person who stutters; I’m a speech-language pathologist; I provide treatment for other people who stutter; I teach graduate students to do stuttering treatment; I am a member of a stuttering support group; and I have cofounded a local chapter of a stuttering support group.
But I think my perspective in this series of articles for Perspectives is partially defined by the others who were asked to contribute. My contribution to this series about support groups is as a clinical educator.
Like many of you, I am both fascinated and frustrated by the problem of stuttering. But in the end, I think that’s what has held my interest for so long. While much of the knowledge about stuttering comes from textbooks, there are limits to what these writings can contribute. Like playing golf or tennis for example, there is only so much you can learn by reading about it. At some point, you need to put a club or a racquet in your hand in order to advance to higher levels of competence and understanding of the game and the culture that surrounds these sports. It’s a little like the difference between knowing how to speak French and having lived among the French people. And so I think that being able to teach the culture of stuttering is what often distinguishes a “good” clinical educator in this disorder from a “superior” one.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.