Syntax, Stress Response, and Speech Motor Control I would like to thank Special Interest Division 4 for providing new researchers with monetary supplements to the ASHFoundation New Investigator Grant. I am grateful to be the recipient of such generosity and hope to contribute meaningfully to the fluency disorders knowledge base. Although my proposed project is currently ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2007
Syntax, Stress Response, and Speech Motor Control
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Kleinow
    La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2007
Syntax, Stress Response, and Speech Motor Control
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2007, Vol. 17, 25-26. doi:10.1044/ffd17.2.25
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2007, Vol. 17, 25-26. doi:10.1044/ffd17.2.25
I would like to thank Special Interest Division 4 for providing new researchers with monetary supplements to the ASHFoundation New Investigator Grant. I am grateful to be the recipient of such generosity and hope to contribute meaningfully to the fluency disorders knowledge base. Although my proposed project is currently in the data collection stage, I would like to present my research proposal regarding the interactions among linguistic complexity, physiological stress responses, and speech motor control to Perspectives readers. I hope to provide a summary of my findings soon.
Linguistic complexity is one variable that is reliably associated with disfluency. The longer or more syntactically complex an utterance is, the more likely it will contain one or more disfluent segments (Ratner, 1997). Additionally, utterance complexity is associated with increased movement variability in adults who stutter (AWS), suggesting that cognitive‐linguistic processing can affect peripheral speech processes in some speakers (Kleinow & Smith, 2000). Although the relationship between linguistic complexity and disfluency is robust in both adults and children who stutter, theories explaining how linguistic factors affect speech motor control are lacking. One hypothesis is that increasing linguistic complexity negatively affects coordination of speech movements in AWS through activation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS).
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