From the Editor The theme for this issue is Defining Normal Fluency. In retrospect, I think a more fitting title would be Exploring the Dimensions of Fluency. The contributors for this issue consider fluency from diverse viewpoints. Their discussions help to illustrate the multidimensional nature of normal fluency and the limited data ... Editorial
Editorial  |   August 01, 2007
From the Editor
Author Notes
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Editorial
Editorial   |   August 01, 2007
From the Editor
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2007, Vol. 17, 3. doi:10.1044/ffd17.2.3
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2007, Vol. 17, 3. doi:10.1044/ffd17.2.3
The theme for this issue is Defining Normal Fluency. In retrospect, I think a more fitting title would be Exploring the Dimensions of Fluency. The contributors for this issue consider fluency from diverse viewpoints. Their discussions help to illustrate the multidimensional nature of normal fluency and the limited data that exists regarding its definition. As you will see, normal fluency encompasses much more than simply not stuttering and does not imply that speech is completely without disfluency.
How do we represent fluency in our discussions with our clients who stutter? In my own search for a viable definition of “fluent speech,” I have found that our knowledge base regarding normal fluency is lacking depth and succinctness. Williams (1979), in his discussion of his “normal talking” model of therapy, stated, “To change efficiently, people need not only to know specifically what to change from, but also, more important, they need a vivid, clear picture of what to change to” (p. 254). The articles in this issue will help to illuminate what we help our clients strive for in therapy. It is my hope that after reading this issue you will have a more descriptive and more accurate representation of normal fluency.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.