Documenting Therapeutic Change With Qualitative Analysis It is apparent that clinicians and clients often view the nature of successful therapy in very different ways (e.g., Finn, 2003; Krauss-Lehrman, & Reeves, 1989; Reeves, 2006; Ryan, 2001; St. Louis, 2006; Yaruss & Quesal, 2002; Yaruss, Quesal, & Murphy, 2002). Historically, researchers, and to some degree clinicians, have focused ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2007
Documenting Therapeutic Change With Qualitative Analysis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Walt Manning
    The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2007
Documenting Therapeutic Change With Qualitative Analysis
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2007, Vol. 17, 23-26. doi:10.1044/ffd17.3.23
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2007, Vol. 17, 23-26. doi:10.1044/ffd17.3.23
It is apparent that clinicians and clients often view the nature of successful therapy in very different ways (e.g., Finn, 2003; Krauss-Lehrman, & Reeves, 1989; Reeves, 2006; Ryan, 2001; St. Louis, 2006; Yaruss & Quesal, 2002; Yaruss, Quesal, & Murphy, 2002). Historically, researchers, and to some degree clinicians, have focused on the frequency, and sometimes the form or quality, of the stuttering as indicators of a successful treatment outcome. Individuals who stutter, on the other hand, tend to view therapy as successful even though they may not achieve the level or quality of fluency desired by some professional clinicians (Reeves, 2006). For example, Krauss-Lehrman and Reeves (1989)  found that 75% of 142 National Stuttering Association members surveyed believed that their therapy had been mildly or very successful even though they occasionally stuttered. Many of the speakers described a sense of accomplishment and felt that their lives were unrestricted by the occasional occurrence of stuttering.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.