A Multidimensional Approach to the Assessment of Children Who Stutter Several textbooks in the area of stuttering (e.g., Conture, 2001; Gregory, 2003; Guitar, 2006; Manning, 2001) provide detailed descriptions of a wide variety of procedures and measures clinicians can include during an assessment of stuttering. In general, the procedures and measures include an assessment of the frequency, duration, and severity ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2007
A Multidimensional Approach to the Assessment of Children Who Stutter
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E. Charles Healey
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2007
A Multidimensional Approach to the Assessment of Children Who Stutter
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2007, Vol. 17, 6-9. doi:10.1044/ffd17.3.6
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2007, Vol. 17, 6-9. doi:10.1044/ffd17.3.6
Several textbooks in the area of stuttering (e.g., Conture, 2001; Gregory, 2003; Guitar, 2006; Manning, 2001) provide detailed descriptions of a wide variety of procedures and measures clinicians can include during an assessment of stuttering. In general, the procedures and measures include an assessment of the frequency, duration, and severity of stuttering; the types of stuttering behaviors observed; the presence and severity of secondary or concomitant behaviors associated with stuttering; and some measure of the client’s feelings and attitudes related to stuttering.
However, it is possible that the comprehensiveness of the procedures and measures suggested in these textbooks are overwhelming to many school-based clinicians because of the limited time they have available to assess stuttering. Even if they had the time to conduct a thorough assessment, clinicians might be uncertain about how to use, interpret, and integrate the data that was collected. Therefore, it would be useful for clinicians to have an organized framework from which to collect, integrate, and interpret assessment information. The purpose of this article is to describe an assessment scale that clinicians can use to organize assessment information obtained from school-age children who stutter in an efficient way.
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