Preparing Clinicians to Treat Stuttering: Looking to the Future Recently, at the ASHA-sponsored Speech-Language Pathology Education Summit, clinicians and academicians explored issues affecting the preparation of future speech-language pathologists. From this discussion emerged several faculty, academic, practice, and student considerations for educating future generations of clinicians to treat stuttering. Preparing this next generation of clinicians will require identifying and ... Article
Article  |   March 2008
Preparing Clinicians to Treat Stuttering: Looking to the Future
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer B. Watson
    Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   March 2008
Preparing Clinicians to Treat Stuttering: Looking to the Future
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, March 2008, Vol. 18, 24-32. doi:10.1044/ffd18.1.24
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, March 2008, Vol. 18, 24-32. doi:10.1044/ffd18.1.24
Abstract

Recently, at the ASHA-sponsored Speech-Language Pathology Education Summit, clinicians and academicians explored issues affecting the preparation of future speech-language pathologists. From this discussion emerged several faculty, academic, practice, and student considerations for educating future generations of clinicians to treat stuttering. Preparing this next generation of clinicians will require identifying and supporting faculty as they share, in ways that are relevant to today’s students, their passion for understanding and treating stuttering. Academic models preparing both undergraduate and graduate students will need to be flexible, less linear, and more integrated with clearly delineated preparation outcomes in stuttering. Partnerships with externship supervisors treating people who stutter should be valued and supported. Further, recognizing and appreciating generational differences in work views will enhance student recruitment and retention in the area of stuttering. The multiple roles and activities associated with stuttering treatment along with the complexities of the disorder may be appealing to current students and speak to their attraction to multitasking and doing work that is meaningful. Pedagogical approaches should integrate technology in meaningful and effective ways. Finally, a Weighted SLP formula is proposed to remind us of the need for multiple strategies in addressing the multidimensionality of these issues.

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