From the Editor This is our first issue to offer ASHA continuing education credit. I second Vivian in her thanks to Lynne Shields, our new CE Administrator, and to Sheryl Gottwald, our Division Associate Coordinator, for all of their efforts in making this possible. Thanks also to the many volunteers who participated ... Editorial
Editorial  |   August 01, 2008
From the Editor
Author Notes
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Editorial
Editorial   |   August 01, 2008
From the Editor
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2008, Vol. 18, 52. doi:10.1044/ffd18.2.52
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2008, Vol. 18, 52. doi:10.1044/ffd18.2.52
This is our first issue to offer ASHA continuing education credit. I second Vivian in her thanks to Lynne Shields, our new CE Administrator, and to Sheryl Gottwald, our Division Associate Coordinator, for all of their efforts in making this possible. Thanks also to the many volunteers who participated in the piloting of this issue (and to Lynne for coordinating this effort).
The theme for this issue is “clinician and client variables in therapy.” We are fortunate to have such a talented group of contributors. Brown, Cameron, and Brown, the authors of the opening article for the issue, come to us from the field of clinical psychology. In their review and discussion of treatment outcomes in psychotherapy, the significance of the clinician-client relationship is highlighted. The article offers compelling evidence of the effect of the clinician in therapy and considerable food for thought when applied to our field of study. In the second article, Williams discusses some of the unique challenges and possible rewards when working with gifted clients. He provides some helpful suggestions to consider if you happen to work with a gifted individual in therapy. Pelczarski and Yaruss illustrate the client’s therapy journey and the many possible twists and turns s/he may encounter as a part of it. They also discuss the clinician’s role and how it changes as a part of this joint venture into therapy. In their study, LaSalle and Duginske consider auditory processing and discrimination abilities in children who do and do not stutter. The results of their study are intriguing and suggest that auditory discrimination differences may need to be considered when treating some children who stutter. Games and Gabel present information related to the joint effort of two universities training graduate speech-language students to work with people who stutter. Their results suggest that graduate students who participated in an intensive treatment program for stuttering, as a part of their clinical experience, developed a greater degree of perceived confidence for working with people who stutter.
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