The Effects of ADHD Medication Changes on a Child Who Stutters This case report describes a 10-year-old boy who presented with comorbid stuttering, ADHD, and Tourette Syndrome. The focus of this case study is the child’s favorable reaction to the non-stimulant Strattera® versus the stimulant Adderall XR® on stuttering behaviors. The family reported increased stuttering, tic behaviors, social anxiety, and communication-related ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2009
The Effects of ADHD Medication Changes on a Child Who Stutters
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph Donaher
    The Center for Childhood Communication, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
  • E. Charles Healey
    Department of Special Education & Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Anneli Zobell
    Department of Special Education & Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2009
The Effects of ADHD Medication Changes on a Child Who Stutters
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2009, Vol. 19, 95-98. doi:10.1044/ffd19.3.95
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2009, Vol. 19, 95-98. doi:10.1044/ffd19.3.95
Abstract

This case report describes a 10-year-old boy who presented with comorbid stuttering, ADHD, and Tourette Syndrome. The focus of this case study is the child’s favorable reaction to the non-stimulant Strattera® versus the stimulant Adderall XR® on stuttering behaviors. The family reported increased stuttering, tic behaviors, social anxiety, and communication-related frustration resulting in social isolation shortly after starting the stimulant medication. Consequently, the medical team discontinued the stimulant medication and prescribed the non-stimulant Strattera® to manage the ADHD symptoms. After initiating the non-stimulant medication, the family reported an increased willingness to interact with peers and reduced aggressiveness while interacting with family members. Compared to the disfluency rate and speech patterning from the first evaluation, the child demonstrated a 63% reduction in disfluency rate and a 51% reduction in the proportion of speech behaviors typical of stuttering. However, the non-stimulant medication was linked with a noticeable increase in impulsivity and decrease in attention/focusing in the academic setting.

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