Trait and State Anxiety in People Who Stutter and People Who Do Not Stutter Abstract: Abstract  Previous research suggests that people who stutter (PWS) tend to have heightened general anxiety (i.e., trait anxiety) and situational anxiety (i.e., state anxiety) compared to people who do ... Article
Article  |   November 2009
Trait and State Anxiety in People Who Stutter and People Who Do Not Stutter
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Scott Palasik
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH
  • Farzan Irani
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH
  • Alexander M. Goberman
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH
  • © 2009 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders
Article   |   November 2009
Trait and State Anxiety in People Who Stutter and People Who Do Not Stutter
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2009, Vol. 19, 99-105. doi:10.1044/ffd19.3.99
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2009, Vol. 19, 99-105. doi:10.1044/ffd19.3.99
Abstract:

Abstract  Previous research suggests that people who stutter (PWS) tend to have heightened general anxiety (i.e., trait anxiety) and situational anxiety (i.e., state anxiety) compared to people who do not stutter (PWDS). Most research with anxiety and stuttering utilizes self-perception scales; however, few studies have looked at anxiety over time. The current study examined self-reported state and trait anxiety in PWS and PWDS over six weeks, along with an investigation of the effects of audio-recording on anxiety. Results indicated no significant group differences in trait (general) anxiety over six weeks; however trends indicated that PWS may have increased trait anxiety compared to PWDS. Furthermore, for both groups, state (situational) anxiety was lower after a recording session compared to before.

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