Specialty Recognition in Fluency Disorders: Challenges for the Second Decade Fluency clinicians pioneered the concept of specialty recognition more than a decade ago. Today, board recognition in fluency disorders is gaining traction among clinicians and consumers, but its impact has been limited by the small size of the specialist community. This article reviews trends in specialty recognition and highlights the ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2010
Specialty Recognition in Fluency Disorders: Challenges for the Second Decade
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James A. McClure
    Specialty Board on Fluency Disorders and National Stuttering Association, Albuquerque, NM
  • Chamonix Olsen
    American Institute for Stuttering and Specialty Board on Fluency Disorders, New York, NY
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2010
Specialty Recognition in Fluency Disorders: Challenges for the Second Decade
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2010, Vol. 20, 15-19. doi:10.1044/ffd20.1.15
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2010, Vol. 20, 15-19. doi:10.1044/ffd20.1.15
Abstract

Fluency clinicians pioneered the concept of specialty recognition more than a decade ago. Today, board recognition in fluency disorders is gaining traction among clinicians and consumers, but its impact has been limited by the small size of the specialist community. This article reviews trends in specialty recognition and highlights the work currently in progress to streamline the recognition process and attract more specialists.

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