Coordinator’s Corner Welcome to the first 2010 issue of Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders! Our hard-working Editor and Associate Editor, Rod Gabel and Joe Donaher, have compiled a variety of interesting and informative articles for us to peruse. We extend many thanks to our peer reviewers who have volunteered their ... Coordinator’s Column
Coordinator’s Column  |   May 01, 2010
Coordinator’s Corner
Author Notes
Article Information
Fluency Disorders / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator’s Column   |   May 01, 2010
Coordinator’s Corner
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2010, Vol. 20, 2-4. doi:10.1044/ffd20.1.2
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2010, Vol. 20, 2-4. doi:10.1044/ffd20.1.2
Welcome to the first 2010 issue of Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders! Our hard-working Editor and Associate Editor, Rod Gabel and Joe Donaher, have compiled a variety of interesting and informative articles for us to peruse. We extend many thanks to our peer reviewers who have volunteered their time and expertise so that Perspectives continues to represent a publication of the highest quality. We also appreciate the tireless efforts of Lynne Shields, our CE Administrator; through her hard work, Division 4 affiliates are able to earn CEUs for reading Perspectives.
In this issue, Jim Tsiamtsiouris and Kim Krieger provide evidence that supports the positive outcomes of the Successful Stuttering Management Program (“The Successful Stuttering Management Program: A Preliminary Report on Outcomes”). Their data demonstrate significant changes not only in overt and covert stuttering behaviors, but also in speech rate, attitudes, and evaluations of the experience of stuttering. Evelyn Klein and Barbara Amster share their study looking at the impact of an academic course in fluency disorders on a student’s knowledge about the causes of stuttering (“Does a Graduate Course in Fluency Disorders Make a Difference?”). Undergraduates without a course in stuttering tended to point to a single cause of stuttering, while graduate students near the end of a fluency course identified a multifactorial basis for stuttering. James McClure and Chamonix Olsen review trends in specialty recognition and discuss the work-in-progress designed to streamline the recognition process and attract more specialists (“Specialty Recognition in Fluency Disorders: Challenges for the Second Decade”). Gottwald, Amster, and LaSalle share an adaptation of the Clinician Competencies included in the ASHA document, Guidelines for Practice in Stuttering Treatment (“A Checklist for Assessing Graduate Student Competencies in the Area of Fluency”). This checklist was developed for use by students, faculty who teach courses in fluency disorders, and clinical supervisors as they evaluate fluency assessment and treatment skills. Finally, Charlie Osborne and colleagues share a bit of history and some future directions for our publication.
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