The Advancement of Neuroimaging Research Investigating Developmental Stuttering We are amassing information about the role of the brain in speech production and the potential neural limitations that coincide with developmental stuttering at a fast rate. As such, it is difficult for many clinician-scientists who are interested in the neural correlates of stuttering to stay informed of the current ... Article
Article  |   November 2011
The Advancement of Neuroimaging Research Investigating Developmental Stuttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deryk S. Beal
    Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Article   |   November 2011
The Advancement of Neuroimaging Research Investigating Developmental Stuttering
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2011, Vol. 21, 88-95. doi:10.1044/ffd21.3.88
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2011, Vol. 21, 88-95. doi:10.1044/ffd21.3.88

We are amassing information about the role of the brain in speech production and the potential neural limitations that coincide with developmental stuttering at a fast rate. As such, it is difficult for many clinician-scientists who are interested in the neural correlates of stuttering to stay informed of the current state of the field. In this paper, I aim to inspire clinician-scientists to tackle hypothesis-driven research that is grounded in neurobiological theory. To this end, I will review the neuroanatomical structures, and their functions, which are implicated in speech production and then describe the relevant differences identified in these structures in people who stutter relative to their fluently speaking peers. I will conclude the paper with suggestions on directions of future research to facilitate the evolution of the field of neuroimaging of stuttering.

Acknowledgments
This work is supported by grants to the author from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Clinical Fellowship program and the Clinician Scientist Training Program (CSTP). The CSTP is funded, fully or in part, by the Ontario Student Opportunity Trust Fund-Hospital for Sick Children Foundation Student Scholarship Program.
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