Use of Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy To Measure Brain Blood Flow Differences During Speaking and Nonspeaking Tasks for Fluent Speakers and Persons Who Stutter Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a novel optical method for measuring blood flow in deep tissues that has not yet been used in stuttering research. DCS is a portable technique that employs low power radiation in a safe region of the electromagnetic spectrum (near-infrared) to noninvasively record relative changes in ... Article
Article  |   November 2011
Use of Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy To Measure Brain Blood Flow Differences During Speaking and Nonspeaking Tasks for Fluent Speakers and Persons Who Stutter
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Glen M. Tellis
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA
  • Rickson C. Mesquita
    Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
    Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin, University of CampinasCampinas, SP (Brazil)
  • A. G. Yodh
    Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   November 2011
Use of Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy To Measure Brain Blood Flow Differences During Speaking and Nonspeaking Tasks for Fluent Speakers and Persons Who Stutter
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2011, Vol. 21, 96-106. doi:10.1044/ffd21.3.96
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2011, Vol. 21, 96-106. doi:10.1044/ffd21.3.96
Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Meeri N. Kim and Alex Thames for assistance with DCS operation and analysis, David R. Busch for helpful discussions and feedback, and Nicholas Barone and Molly Correll for analyzing the speech samples. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health through R01-NS060653 and P41-RR002305 (AGY). This work was also supported by the Brassington Research Grant.

Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a novel optical method for measuring blood flow in deep tissues that has not yet been used in stuttering research. DCS is a portable technique that employs low power radiation in a safe region of the electromagnetic spectrum (near-infrared) to noninvasively record relative changes in regional blood flow. The technology has successfully probed hemodynamic responses of the human brain and can potentially be used to assess and understand differences in brain areas associated with speech production in persons who stutter and normally fluent speakers. This pilot study reports on the feasibility of DCS to assess blood flow levels in the brains of persons who stutter and normally fluent speakers during speaking and nonspeaking tasks including, singing, counting, choral reading, conversational speech, and reading aloud.

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