The Impact of a Stuttering Disorder on Western Australian Children and Adolescents In this study, we examined the impact of a stuttering disorder on children (n=50) and adolescents (n=45) living in Western Australia. We compared the reactions and experiences of children and adolescents who stutter to children and adolescents who do not stutter. We compared the participants who stuttered and the fluent ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2012
The Impact of a Stuttering Disorder on Western Australian Children and Adolescents
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janet M. Beilby
    School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  • Michelle L. Byrnes
    Australian Neuro-Muscular Research Institute, CNND, University of Western AustraliaCrawley, Western Australia, Australia
  • J. Scott Yaruss
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Disclosure: Janet M. Beilby has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Janet M. Beilby has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Michelle L. Byrnes has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Michelle L. Byrnes has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: J Scott Yaruss is the co-author of the OASES and receives royalties from its sale.
    Disclosure: J Scott Yaruss is the co-author of the OASES and receives royalties from its sale.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2012
The Impact of a Stuttering Disorder on Western Australian Children and Adolescents
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 51-62. doi:10.1044/ffd22.2.51
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 51-62. doi:10.1044/ffd22.2.51

In this study, we examined the impact of a stuttering disorder on children (n=50) and adolescents (n=45) living in Western Australia. We compared the reactions and experiences of children and adolescents who stutter to children and adolescents who do not stutter. We compared the participants who stuttered and the fluent participants using adapted versions of the Overall Assessment of the Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES). We also examined the relationship between biopsychosocial impact and stuttered speech frequency. We saw higher levels of adverse impact in young people who stuttered compared to their fluent peers. In addition, we found moderate correlations between OASES scores and stuttered speech frequency in children. These findings provided a baseline for establishing the degree of negative impact that a stuttering disorder may bring about in children and adolescents. The experiences of young people who stuttered were significantly different from the experiences of young people who were typically fluent. These findings reinforce the notion that stuttering is a disorder that can lead to negative impact for young people.

Acknowledgements
This study was supported by Project Grants from the Neurotrauma Research Program (Government of Western Australia). The authors would like to thank all the participants involved and the anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments in improving this manuscript.
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