Acceptance: A Clinical Discussion Most older children, adolescents, and adults who stutter, in our experience, desire no stuttering moments and removal of all fear, anxiety, and avoidance behaviors associated with speaking. We can assist them with one or all of these treatment outcomes if the circumstances are appropriate (e.g., proper motivation, adequate time ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2012
Acceptance: A Clinical Discussion
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jason H. Davidow
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Hofstra University, Hampstead, NY
  • Lori Melnitsky
    All Island Speech and Stuttering Therapy, Plainview, NY
  • Disclosure: Jason H. Davidow has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Jason H. Davidow has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Lori Melnitsky has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Lori Melnitsky has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2012
Acceptance: A Clinical Discussion
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 63-66. doi:10.1044/ffd22.2.63
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 63-66. doi:10.1044/ffd22.2.63
Most older children, adolescents, and adults who stutter, in our experience, desire no stuttering moments and removal of all fear, anxiety, and avoidance behaviors associated with speaking. We can assist them with one or all of these treatment outcomes if the circumstances are appropriate (e.g., proper motivation, adequate time for fluency practice, adhering to the treatment program, and making progress). Often, however, circumstances do not lend themselves to those outcomes and “acceptance” of the disorder becomes critical, along with improving fluency. Although what each client is willing to accept varies and changes as treatment progresses, most of our clients mention they would be content being a self-confident speaker, quickly overcoming anxiety during speaking situations, and saying what they want to say when they want to say it. Persons who stutter ultimately want to not stutter; therefore, if they have stuttering moments, some undesirable emotions (e.g., uneasiness when speaking), cognitions, and/or avoidance behaviors, even if fleeting, are inevitable. However, appreciating that these instances may occur and not letting them impact one’s self-worth; continually striving to quickly move past these moments, communicate intended ideas, and engage in desired speaking contexts; and leading a fulfilling social life, in our opinion, represent acceptance of the disorder and are remarkable treatment outcomes.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.