Treatment of Stuttering in a School-Age Child: A Description of a Single Case-Study In this article, I will provide support for a broad-based treatment approach with school-age children who stutter. Treatments for stuttering have traditionally prioritized speech modification techniques. However, school-age children who stutter experience a range of self-defeating thoughts and emotions about speaking. In this article, I present data from a case ... Case Study
Case Study  |   November 01, 2012
Treatment of Stuttering in a School-Age Child: A Description of a Single Case-Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Derek E. Daniels
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
  • Disclosure: Derek E. Daniels has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Derek E. Daniels has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Case Study
Case Study   |   November 01, 2012
Treatment of Stuttering in a School-Age Child: A Description of a Single Case-Study
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 88-96. doi:10.1044/ffd22.2.88
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 88-96. doi:10.1044/ffd22.2.88

In this article, I will provide support for a broad-based treatment approach with school-age children who stutter. Treatments for stuttering have traditionally prioritized speech modification techniques. However, school-age children who stutter experience a range of self-defeating thoughts and emotions about speaking. In this article, I present data from a case study of one school-age child who stutters. The participant experienced three semesters of treatment from a university clinic. Experts applied a broad-based treatment approach that included both speech and stuttering modification techniques and strategies for managing psychosocial aspects of stuttering. Results suggest that successful therapeutic outcomes depended on a broad-based approach of addressing the participant’s speech, attitudes, and emotions. Clinical implications are discussed.

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