Client Reports of Successful Treatment Approaches Purpose: The purpose of this study was to obtain the perspectives of people who stutter (PWS) on the effectiveness of various stuttering treatment approaches based on their experiences with different treatment programs/protocols. Methods: 68 PWS responded to an internet-based survey. We recruited participants by asking speech-language pathologists with an interest ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2012
Client Reports of Successful Treatment Approaches
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eric Swartz
    Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Kingsville, TX
  • Farzan Irani
    Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, TX
  • Rodney Gabel
    The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH
  • Disclosure: Eric Swartz has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Eric Swartz has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Farzan Irani has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Farzan Irani has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Rodney Gabel has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Rodney Gabel has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Article
Article   |   November 01, 2012
Client Reports of Successful Treatment Approaches
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 97-104. doi:10.1044/ffd22.2.97
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 97-104. doi:10.1044/ffd22.2.97

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to obtain the perspectives of people who stutter (PWS) on the effectiveness of various stuttering treatment approaches based on their experiences with different treatment programs/protocols.

Methods: 68 PWS responded to an internet-based survey. We recruited participants by asking speech-language pathologists with an interest in fluency disorders to forward the survey to past and present clients. All participants completed a demographic questionnaire, which gathered general information as well as self-rated stuttering severity and previous treatment experiences.

Results: A majority of the participants reported success with traditional treatment approaches, including fluency shaping, stuttering modification, and counseling. Conversely, a majority of participants reported little to no success with nontraditional approaches such as devices and medication.

Conclusions: The findings of this study provide preliminary evidence that participants benefit from all mainstream treatment approaches discussed in literature; however, the amount of success experienced varies from one individual to the next. We discuss implications for clinicians.

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