Disfluency Characteristics Observed in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Preliminary Report This descriptive study evaluates the speech disfluencies of 8 verbal children between 3 and 5 years of age with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Speech samples were collected for each child during standardized interactions. Percentage and types of disfluencies observed during speech samples are discussed. Although they did not have a ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2010
Disfluency Characteristics Observed in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Preliminary Report
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura W. Plexico
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Julie E. Cleary
    School of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
  • Ashlynn McAlpine
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Allison M. Plumb
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2010
Disfluency Characteristics Observed in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Preliminary Report
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2010, Vol. 20, 42-50. doi:10.1044/ffd20.2.42
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2010, Vol. 20, 42-50. doi:10.1044/ffd20.2.42

This descriptive study evaluates the speech disfluencies of 8 verbal children between 3 and 5 years of age with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Speech samples were collected for each child during standardized interactions. Percentage and types of disfluencies observed during speech samples are discussed. Although they did not have a clinical diagnosis of stuttering, all of the young children with ASD in this study produced disfluencies. In addition to stuttering-like disfluencies and other typical disfluencies, the children with ASD also produced atypical disfluencies, which usually are not observed in children with typically developing speech or developmental stuttering. (Yairi & Ambrose, 2005).

Acknowledgements
This research was supported in part by a grant from Autism Speaks. This research formed part of the third author’s undergraduate thesis, which was conducted under the supervision of the first author. The authors would like to thank the families who gave their time to participate in this project.
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