Obituary: Oliver Bloodstein Oliver Bloodstein, a major founding father of the modern field of speech-language pathology and an internationally respected expert on stuttering, died July 4, 2010 at the age of 89. He was born on December 2, 1920 in New York City. He received his Bachelor of Arts from the College ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   August 01, 2010
Obituary: Oliver Bloodstein
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nan Bernstein-Ratner
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Viewpoints
Viewpoint   |   August 01, 2010
Obituary: Oliver Bloodstein
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2010, Vol. 20, 62-63. doi:10.1044/ffd20.2.62
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2010, Vol. 20, 62-63. doi:10.1044/ffd20.2.62
Oliver Bloodstein, a major founding father of the modern field of speech-language pathology and an internationally respected expert on stuttering, died July 4, 2010 at the age of 89. He was born on December 2, 1920 in New York City. He received his Bachelor of Arts from the College of the City of New York in 1941 and, dissuaded from a potential career as an English teacher because of poor employment prospects, he was counseled about the emerging field of speech-language pathology and traveled to the University of Iowa to study with Lee Edward Travis. Travis was widely credited with developing the discipline of speech-language pathology by merging and extending work from fields such as psychology, medicine, traditional speech studies (rhetoric and oratory), and linguistics. Although Travis had actually left Iowa prior to his arrival, Bloodstein stayed to work with Wendell Johnson, another major early figure in the field. He received his Master of Arts degree in 1942, and his Ph.D. from Iowa in 1948. At the time that his first publication appeared, Bloodstein was far from the ivy-covered walls of academe, serving in the 37th infantry division of the US Army, in the Solomon Islands. For years, his vivid depictions of life as a young, physically small and slight, pale, city-bred and rather “bookish” foot soldier serving in the War in the Pacific (including campaigns in the Philippines as well as the Solomons) entranced both family and colleagues.
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