Talking About Stuttering With a Known Person Who Stutters: Impact on Perceptions Towards Stuttering The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which talking about stuttering with a known person who stuttered affected perceptions towards stuttering. A total of 152 participants completed survey items related to demographic information, perceptions of the known person who stutters, and whether or not they discussed ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2011
Talking About Stuttering With a Known Person Who Stutters: Impact on Perceptions Towards Stuttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles Hughes
    Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH
  • Rodney Gabel
    Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH
  • Scott Palasik
    University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburgh, MS
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2011
Talking About Stuttering With a Known Person Who Stutters: Impact on Perceptions Towards Stuttering
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2011, Vol. 21, 50-58. doi:10.1044/ffd21.2.50
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2011, Vol. 21, 50-58. doi:10.1044/ffd21.2.50

The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which talking about stuttering with a known person who stuttered affected perceptions towards stuttering. A total of 152 participants completed survey items related to demographic information, perceptions of the known person who stutters, and whether or not they discussed stuttering with the person they knew. Finally, participants completed two separate semantic differential scales. The first scale was completed in regard to the person participants knew who stuttered, while the second semantic differential scale was completed regarding a hypothetical “average” person who stuttered. A one-way analysis of variance was conducted for these two semantic differential scales, with the effect of the independent variable of whether participants talked about stuttering with the known person who stuttered. Findings revealed that talking about stuttering with a known person who stuttered did not affect perceptions towards the person or an average person who stuttered. Despite this finding, it should be noted that participants reported relatively positive attitudes towards both the person they knew who stuttered and the average person who stuttered. Future research should continue to explore the benefits of disclosure or discussing stuttering for both people who stutter and listeners.

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