Clinical Use of Self-Reports to Measure CBT Program Outcomes In this paper, we explore the treatment effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) in a group therapy environment with 11 adults between the ages of 20 and 70 years old. We used the Clinical Use of Self-Report (SSI-4; Riley, 2009) to measure change following a 10-week program. Analysis of self-report ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2013
Clinical Use of Self-Reports to Measure CBT Program Outcomes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane Parris Constantino
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Sargent College,, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Sara Eger
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Sargent College,, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Melanie Matthies
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Sargent College,, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: Diane Parris Constantino has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Diane Parris Constantino has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Sara Eger has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Sara Eger has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Melanie Matthies has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Melanie Matthies has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2013
Clinical Use of Self-Reports to Measure CBT Program Outcomes
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2013, Vol. 23, 15-20. doi:10.1044/ffd23.1.15
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2013, Vol. 23, 15-20. doi:10.1044/ffd23.1.15

In this paper, we explore the treatment effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) in a group therapy environment with 11 adults between the ages of 20 and 70 years old. We used the Clinical Use of Self-Report (SSI-4; Riley, 2009) to measure change following a 10-week program. Analysis of self-report measures before and after the program indicated that seven participants showed moderate-to-strong improvement in their overall test scores after completing CBT with increased effect size observed for response to strangers and authority figures.

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