Initial Counseling With Parents of Preschoolers who Stutter: Enhancing Graduate Students' Skills Using Simulated Caregivers No other therapeutic approach to stuttering in general has achieved the consensus of support given to parental involvement in the clinical management of early childhood stuttering. In most cases, this involvement begins with and is based on information received during the initial evaluation. This extremely important initial step in the ... Article
Article  |   May 2013
Initial Counseling With Parents of Preschoolers who Stutter: Enhancing Graduate Students' Skills Using Simulated Caregivers
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brent Andrew Gregg
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, Arkansas
  • Brent Andrew Gregg

    Disclosure: Brent Andrew Gregg has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.

  • © 2013 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders
Article   |   May 2013
Initial Counseling With Parents of Preschoolers who Stutter: Enhancing Graduate Students' Skills Using Simulated Caregivers
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2013, Vol. 23, 21-29. doi:10.1044/ffd23.1.21
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, May 2013, Vol. 23, 21-29. doi:10.1044/ffd23.1.21

No other therapeutic approach to stuttering in general has achieved the consensus of support given to parental involvement in the clinical management of early childhood stuttering. In most cases, this involvement begins with and is based on information received during the initial evaluation. This extremely important initial step in the therapeutic process often can prove difficult for beginning clinicians, especially because of the current landscape of graduate clinical training opportunities. In this manuscript, I will provide a framework for the use of simulated caregivers in the process of enhancing the parent counseling skills during an initial evaluation of graduate students in communication sciences and disorders. Though the field of communication disorders has come late to the idea of using simulated patients, there is a rich and varied literature on this teaching tool in other healthcare fields (e.g., nursing, medicine, psychology). What follows is a review of: (a) the factors affecting graduate training in fluency, (b) the need for better training in parent counseling during the preliminary stages of working with preschool CWS, and (c) a possible framework for this incorporating this training in a tightly-controlled clinical opportunity.

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