Teacher Knowledge and Perceptions of Stuttering and Bullying in School‐Age Children. Purpose: To evaluate teacher knowledge and perceptions of the development and management of stuttering, as well as bullying. Method: A 32‐item web‐based survey was created to address the purposes of this investigation. Participants were recruited in 5 states representing diverse geographic regions by sending an e‐mail with an attached information ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2013
Teacher Knowledge and Perceptions of Stuttering and Bullying in School‐Age Children.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura W. Plexico
    Auburn University
  • Allison M. Plumb
    Auburn University
  • Jillian Beacham
    Auburn University
  • Disclosure: Financial: Laura Plexico is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Auburn University. Allison Plumb is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Auburn University.
    Disclosure: Financial: Laura Plexico is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Auburn University. Allison Plumb is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Auburn University.×
    Nonfinancial: Laura Plexico and Allison Plumb have previously published in this subject area.
    Nonfinancial: Laura Plexico and Allison Plumb have previously published in this subject area.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2013
Teacher Knowledge and Perceptions of Stuttering and Bullying in School‐Age Children.
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2013, Vol. 23, 39-53. doi:10.1044/ffd23.2.39
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, November 2013, Vol. 23, 39-53. doi:10.1044/ffd23.2.39

Purpose: To evaluate teacher knowledge and perceptions of the development and management of stuttering, as well as bullying.

Method: A 32‐item web‐based survey was created to address the purposes of this investigation. Participants were recruited in 5 states representing diverse geographic regions by sending an e‐mail with an attached information letter and an embedded e‐mail link. A total of 84 teachers completed the survey.

Results: Teachers demonstrated a general understanding of the cause and characteristics associated with stuttering; however, teachers indicated some feelings of discomfort surrounding stuttering and there were some indications that they are not clear on the best ways to manage it, nor do they have access to materials. The majority identified bullying as a problem at their schools and encountered bullying of children who stutter.

Conclusions: The results from this investigation were mixed in that teachers demonstrated insight into some areas of stuttering and bullying, but decreased awareness or misperceptions in others. The findings highlight the critical role of the speech‐language pathologist in the continued need for in‐services and information provision on the nature and management of childhood stuttering as well as bullying.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.