Coping With Stuttering Purpose: The purpose of this research was to gain a deeper understanding about coping strategies by adults who stutter (AWS). Methods: A mixed methods approach was used to gather responses from 61 participants in response to a questionnaire with forced choice and open-ended questions. Participants were recruited via speech-language ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2014
Coping With Stuttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eric Swartz
    Department of Clinical Health Sciences, Program in Communication Sciences and Disorders, Texas A&M University – Kingsville, Kingsville, TX, USA
  • Farzan Irani
    Department of Communication Disorders, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USA
  • Rodney Gabel
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Speech-Language Pathology Judith Herb College of Education, Health Sciences and Human Services, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH
  • Disclosures: Financial: Eric Swartz, Farzan Irani, and Rodney Gabel have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosures: Financial: Eric Swartz, Farzan Irani, and Rodney Gabel have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Disclosures: Nonfinancial: Eric Swartz has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Farzan Irani is the associate editor of ASHA's Special Interest Group 4. Rodney Gabel has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Disclosures: Nonfinancial: Eric Swartz has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Farzan Irani is the associate editor of ASHA's Special Interest Group 4. Rodney Gabel has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2014
Coping With Stuttering
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, December 2014, Vol. 24, 58-68. doi:10.1044/ffd24.2.58
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, December 2014, Vol. 24, 58-68. doi:10.1044/ffd24.2.58

Purpose: The purpose of this research was to gain a deeper understanding about coping strategies by adults who stutter (AWS).

Methods: A mixed methods approach was used to gather responses from 61 participants in response to a questionnaire with forced choice and open-ended questions. Participants were recruited via speech-language pathologists who forwarded the questionnaire to present and past clients who stutter.

Results: Successful coping with stuttering had a positive correlation with a lower stuttering severity. The following themes where indicative of successful coping with stuttering: (1) living your life with stuttering, (2) managing stuttering with no negative impact, and (3) positive effects and speech therapy and techniques on stuttering. Unsuccessful coping with stuttering was described as: (1) avoidance, (2) negative impact on life, (3) treatment did not work, and (4) coping is difficult.

Conclusions: The findings from this study indicated that AWS with a lower severity of stuttering cope better with their stuttering. Qualitative responses provided insight into how AWS perceive successful and unsuccessful coping with stuttering and how that impacts their overall quality of life.

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